Illustration

A Day By The River

My first art fair has come and gone and it was a wonderful experience. Right by the water with music and other local artists. The event raised money for Boulder County (where I live) arts. I hope to do more art fairs in the near future. As the holidays draw near consider attending local art/ craft/ artisan fairs. You might find some amazing work and you will be helping the local economy. Happy Friday!

Putting Yourself Out There

I meant to post this earlier in the week. Oh well, better late than never…

I’ve reached a new stage in my career as an artist that I thought I would share with folks. Today I’ll be selling my work at a booth at the Arts on the River fair in Lyons, Colorado. I’m excited to be taking this step; it is well past due. Even after posting on this blog for two years, it feels awkward putting myself out there in a booth. That said, I’m excited.

I plan to participate in more art fairs in the future. Below is a sample of the items I will be offering for this event.  Happy Sunday!

From The Throat Of The Kingfisher

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I’m back! Sorry for the absence. I’m taking my time with my illustrations these days so that means fewer posts. So…let’s begin

This illustration is inspired by the discovery of a new frog species in Southern India (in the state of Karnataka). For years the call of the Karaavali skittering frog was mistaken for the call of the White-throated Kingfisher. That was until a very clever herpetologist discovered that it was not the call of a kingfisher but in fact the call of a frog. Through audio and video documentation followed by DNA analysis the unknown frog was discovered and named. Thus the Karaavali skittering frog sprung forth from the throat of the White-throated Kingfisher (not literally of course). Alas, the frog is already threatened due to habitat loss. A cruel reality in the world of wildlife biology- discovery is followed by loss.

About This Illustration: When I read the linked article about the discovery of the Krivaavali skittering frog, this image took shape immediately. I somewhat incorporated Indian art and textile design into this illustration. It was a fun process involving watercolor, acrylic ink, India ink, and colored pencils.

You can purchase a print of this illustration through my Etsy shop, ScienceStories: https://www.etsy.com/listing/551252519/from-the-throat-of-the-kingfisher

If the plight of critters moves you, consider donating to:

Wildlife Conservation Society: https://www.wcs.org

The Nature Conservancy: https://www.nature.org

Audubon Society: http://www.audubon.org

Or other international or local conservation nonprofits. If you have the time please consider volunteering as well. I will write more about that in the future.

 

Happy Pollinator Week!

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June 19th-25th 2017 is designated as Pollinator Week by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of the Interior! So go out and hug your local pollinator…or maybe just plant some native wildflowers. And lay off those pesticides.

To find out more about Pollinator Week and activities in your area: http://pollinator.org/pollinatorweek/

https://www.fws.gov/pollinators/

Or join a Citizen Science Project: Bumble Bee Watch Butterflies and Moths of North America

A print of this illustration can be purchased through my Etsy shop, ScienceStories: https://www.etsy.com/listing/523902966/bumble-bee-garden-85×11-inch-watercolor

The King Of All Tides

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During a Supermoon/ King Tide event last year an octopus ended up in a parking garage in Miami. A King Tide is an exceptionally high tide. Last year I wrote about Supermoons in “I See A Bad Moon Rising” but basically it is the occurrence of a full or new moon at the closest point to the earth during it’s orbital path (so it looks super big). Sea level rise due to climate change exacerbate the impacts of a King Tide, leading to an increase in  coastal flooding events. And perhaps more cephalopod sightings?

About the Illustration: Watercolor, India ink, and micron pens. Inspired by the work of Yuko Shimizu (one of my favs). This illustration can be purchased as an 8.5×11 inch print through my Etsy shop: https://www.etsy.com/listing/518660474/the-king-of-all-tides-art-print

Fungus Among Us & Other Things

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Happy Sunday! So I’m trying something new. From now on I will start posting multiple short topics on recent articles I have read, organizations or artists that I follow, or other science or sciart related topics. I figure variety is the spice of life. Let me know what you think!

Fungus Among Us-A recent article in the New York Times discusses the art of wild mushroom hunting and the bioluminescence that some mushroom species emit.

Bambi Likes Ribs-From Popular Science, a deer was spotted munching on a human carcass by forensic scientist on a body farm. Note-Do NOT Google “body farm images” if you spook easily.

The Crowd and the Cloud-A new show premiers on PBS about citizen science and the use of mobile technology to help collect data on a variety of topics.

Courtney Mattison-An amazing ceramic artist who creates intricate coral reef ecosystems out of clay to help highlight their importance and their fragile state due to human-induced threats.

Minute Earth-Short animated YouTube videos on a variety of scientific topics such as “Why Some Molecules Have Evil Twins“.

About the Illustration: Acrylic painting of mushrooms at night (with some glow in the dark ferns).

Barbara of the Corn

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My 11th hour post for March, Woman’s History Month. Barbara McClintock, an American scientist and cytogeneticist won the 1983 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine for her discovery of transposable elements or jumping genes. Through her work with maize, she found that genes can actually move with the potential to activate and inactivate surrounding genes. Her work is pivotal to our understanding of genes and heredity. She is also an inspiration to women in the sciences (and beyond).

Note: Check out the excellent Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers who Changed the World by Rachel Ignotofsky if you would like to learn more.

  About the illustration: Watercolor ink and micron pens on Yupo paper.